Measuring your SlideShare success


I know that a lot of my leads for speaking engagements have come through SlideShare. People who invite me tell me that they actually found my ideas through SlideShare and were convinced I would be a good speaker or sparring partner for their case. Until now I haven’t really thought how to analyze what works and what doesn’t. I just know what presentations are viewed most often.

Anyway, my experience is that by sharing your presentations you will get more than you would get otherwise. More leads and valuable feedback. The downside is that you become conscious that giving the same presentation twice doesn’t help your online distribution at all. You have to keep on changing and that’s great for everybody.

I took the views, downloads and favorites stats of all of my presentations and put them on a spreadsheet. This was easily done by looking at the document stats at LeadShare (business extension on SlideShare to encourage leads).

Then I looked at the following things:

  • The relative percentage of downloads compared to views. The assumption is that people are more likely to download the presentation if they find it useful.
  • The relative percentage of views + downloads for a single presentation compared to all views + downloads for all presentations. This gives you a good overview what presentations are actually leading the way (or have got most exposure).
  • The relative percentage of favorites to views + downloads for a single presentation. The assumption is that people will favorite a presentation because they love it or want to store it for later reference.

Of course it’s hard to get an objective view here, because:

  • Certain good stuff is picked up by more popular bloggers and some perhaps even better stuff sometimes never gets picked up at all.
  • A great enhancer for traffic is also the moment when your presentation gets featured by SlideShare. This has happened to several of my presentations.
  • In the other hand, time is here an issue: my presentations are published in around two month intervals since October 2006, not all of the presentations have been available for the same time.

Therefore, the view, download and favorite counts are not good enough indicators of how you are doing, but rather the relative percentages I’ve been calculating. Below you can see my current situation on SlideShare:

The most popular presentation by far is my Web 2.0 Business Models presentation with 40.35% of all traffic. This doesn’t mean it’s the best presentation. If you look at some of the relative percentages, you can see what presentations likely generate most value to their viewers.

Most downloaded presentations compared to views:

18.39% – Web 2.0 Business Models
13.07% – Vision of the future: Organization 2.0
11.43% – Culture Matters – The cultural requirements for Web 2.0 powered innovation, networking, and collaboration
10.69% – Innovation and Microinformation
09.48% – Age of Real-Time: Future Trends in a Digital World

Most favorite presentations compared to views+downloads (I have highlighted the ones that are also in the most downloaded chart):

2.34% – Collaborative Edge: Real-Time Social Technologies in Organizations
1.69% – In the age of real-time: The complex, social, and serendipitous learning offered via the Web
1.40% – Age of Real-Time: Future Trends in a Digital World
0.92% – Vision of the future: Organization 2.0

0.91% – Using Social Technologies to Run Better Events

How would you improve these stats?

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  • http://www.synestesia.fi Lauri Gröhn

    Interesting article. Those tables with 2 decimals are a little bit funny. Place for more education…